Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Philippe Égalité



Richard has a post about the notorious aristocrat and revolutionary, Philippe Égalité. He cast the deciding vote which sent his cousin Louis XVI to his death. (Note the masonic insignia pinned to his robes beneath the medal of the Holy Spirit.) Share

9 comments:

Vara said...

It seems that the parallels between the two revolutions, French and Russian, seem to come to a yet higher level. The disloyal aristocrats in the March revolution were mainly Masons, and it appears that the Bourbons who assisted the revolutionists were also of the same order.

In our case, most of the exiled Masonic aristocrats and their hangers-ons settled in Paris and founded a modernist sect of the Orthodox Church which still limps on to this day. What happened to the disloyal French Masonic aristocrats (save those sent to Madame Guillotine, of course)? Did they do likewise? Or, did they come to their senses?

Vara

elena maria vidal said...

Philippe always reminds me of Kyril V.

de Brantigny said...

You dont think I was tolight on the fellow do you?

elena maria vidal said...

Ha, ha. No.

alaughland said...

When one delves into the origins of the French Revolution one discovers it was not staged by peasants but by aristocrats and the 'intelligentsia'.

Anonymous said...

Philippe got a dose of his own medicine.

Matterhorn said...

How is it that he cast the *deciding* vote? I've never properly understood this. Wasn't the King condemned by more than one vote?

Also, you mention in "Trianon" that he could legally have abstained from voting. Why was that?

Blood-chilling, in any case!

elena maria vidal said...

His was the vote that caused the scales to tip in favor of killing the King. Almost half of the Assembly wanted to send him into exile. Philippe could have been exempted since he was a relative of the King.

Matterhorn said...

I see! Thank you!