Monday, January 3, 2011

Another Tragic Stuart

Princess Elizabeth of Great Britain, daughter of Charles I and Henrietta Maria, died as a prisoner of Cromwell. Share

6 comments:

Matterhorn said...

In a way, Princess Elizabeth was luckier than Madame Royale; in another way, unluckier. Marie-Thérèse had far worse experiences in her youth, but at least she lived to adulthood and had quite a full life.

lara77 said...

Thank you for this article Elena Maria! I never knew of Princess Elizabeth; how very sad. What is it with republics? Cromwell, Danton, Robespierre; why take revenge on innocent children. Are these men so totally evil? The fact that Cromwell would not let her leave with her mother was simply outrageous. I guess he was intelligent enough to know that in Britain boys AND girls may inherit the royal throne. The sarcophagus of Princess Elizabeth is so beautiful it breaks your heart.

elena maria vidal said...

There was no reason for Elizabeth to be a prisoner.

Matterhorn said...

I am confused about something; how is it that Catholic princesses like Henrietta Maria were allowed to marry Protestants, when everyone knew that their children would be raised as Protestants? Also, were the brides married in Protestant ceremonies? Was that permitted at the time?

I was reading recently about the marriage negotiations of the Catholic Leopold of Belgium and the Lutheran Astrid of Sweden (1920's) and by then, the Catholic rules were very strict: the prince could only marry a Protestant if she agreed to raise the children as Catholics, and they were not allowed to have a Protestant wedding ceremony- just an emphatically *civil* marriage in Stockholm, then a Catholic religious marriage in Brussels- this was diplomatically quite awkward, but the Belgian royal family was told that it was intrinsically wrong for a Catholic to take part in a Protestant wedding ceremony and even the Pope could not give a dispensation for it. This puzzled me, though, when I thought of these earlier royal marriages...was there a more flexible view of these matters earlier on?

elena maria vidal said...

In earlier times the rules were not as strict. Or let us say it was left to the conscience of the Catholic spouse. It was not until the 19th century that Protestants marrying Catholics had to promise that the children would be raised Catholic in order for the marriage to be blessed by the Church. However, in those past times there were usually two wedding ceremonies, a Catholic one and a Protestant one.

Matterhorn said...

That clears things up, thank you!