Tuesday, October 30, 2007

On the Veiling of Women

Hallowed Ground has an interesting discussion, with a link to quotes from some of the Church Fathers. Up through Victorian times, married woman in the West usually wore little caps or bonnets even at home, not just at church. Some Protestant fundamentalist sects have continued this practice. (Are they aware it comes from Tertullian?) Such social customs are interesting; it is intriguing how various practices evolve through the centuries and adapt to different cultures. St. Paul only mentioned having women's heads covered in church, which was in the code of canon law until 1981. More discussion here. Share

6 comments:

Paula said...

I am considering to start wearing a head-cover when I attend Mass. Nobody does this here in Germany so I am afraid that I will look odd. In Romania the practice is still observed by some Eastern-Orthodox and Greek-Catholic ladies. I know how one feels with and without a head-cover. A head-cover in the church is like a statement of orthodoxy. It is also an invitation for restrain to those who may look at you...

elena maria vidal said...

Considering what times we live in, I think each one needs to decide what is suitable and effective for the given circumstances and situation. One can always wear a hat or beret rather than a mantilla, but it is up to you.

Paula said...

Yes. true Elena. I think my Kashmir foulard would be OK. It is cold in these old churches from here anyway.:-)

elena maria vidal said...

That sounds lovely! Saint Francis de Sales said that there is nothing wrong with being quietly elegant! In fact, he recommended it!

alaughland said...

If you think about it much of what Catholics and Protestants do come from Judiasm. I wouldn't like to go back to head coverings, but respect for a woman's reputation slipped away with the head coverings. For better or for worse, the Women's Liberation Movement has been creeping along for many decades and started in small ways before the inception of the NOW movement.

elena maria vidal said...

Well, I think it was mostly for the worst. Don't you?