Saturday, January 2, 2010

Queen Charlotte

The consort of King George III.
As Queen, Charlotte was a model of gracious royal patronage. She supported Johann Christian Bach and met Mozart as a young boy and he dedicated his Opus 3 to her. She also supported Joseph Haydn, built orphanages, hospitals for expectant mothers and supported women's education. She also dabbled in botany, founded Kew Gardens and supported a number of artists. She had a very loving relationship with her husband and herself suffered greatly as he descended into madness because of his porphyria. She also maintained a long-distance friendship with the French Queen Marie Antoinette, the two being pen pals. Queen Charlotte worried alot about her French counterpart with the onset of the Revolution and prepared a place for the Bourbon royal couple should they be forced to escape to England. When the French queen was executed Charlotte was deeply disturbed and depressed by the news.

Queen Charlotte looked after her husband for the rest of her life, being his legal guardian, never failing in her devotion until her death on November 17, 1818 with her son the Prince-Regent holding her hand. Although she was not given the warmest welcome when she first arrived in Britain she won the hearts of the people by her warmth, generosity and unfailing devotion to her husband and family. She was, in many ways, the ideal queen consort.
I love Helen Mirren's portrayal of Queen Charlotte in The Madness of King George. Share

7 comments:

Emmeline Cartwright said...

hi,
i liked this post very much.
can you tell me who did the portrait?

elena maria vidal said...

I am not certain, Emmeline. Perhaps you could ask The Mad Monarchist.
http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2009/12/consort-profile-charlotte-of.html

Theodore Harvey said...

Queen Charlotte holds a special place in my heart as I lived for four years in the city named after her, Charlotte, North Carolina (complete with little crowns on all the street signs). And the county is Mecklenburg County since she was a princess of Mecklenburg. There are statues of her both downtown and at the airport. I doubt that many Charlotteans care about this as much as I did. When I left Charlotte in 2008, the Charlotte Symphony cello section gave me a large framed portrait of her as a going-away present.

elena maria vidal said...

How delightful!

Olive Tree Guitar Ensemble said...

Hi, it's a great blog.
I could tell how much efforts you've taken on it.
Keep doing!

lara77 said...

Elena Maria; I never knew that there was any correspondence between the Queen of Great Britain and the Queen of France. I was right when I said I learn so much through your lovely website! Queen Charlotte was an amazing woman; an ideal wife, mother and queen. Thank you again Elena Maria; it is always a great day when I start reading Tea at Trianon.

elena maria vidal said...

Yes, Marie-Antoinette wrote to Queen Charlotte saying how sorry she was about the war. The Queen of France did not think it wise to help the colonists rebel; she thought it was setting a bad precedent.