Friday, January 21, 2011

A Moment for Louis On His Day

Remembering Louis XVI in pictures. Share

6 comments:

Matterhorn said...

The Coursacs did an interesting study of the various portraits of Louis XVI. I'm a bit chary of accepting all of their conclusions, but their work is always intriguing and contrary to stereotypes; it stimulates thought.

elena maria vidal said...

They did not like Marie-Antoinette, but their assessment of Louis I totally agree with.

anothertwocents said...

If I may inquire, why do you think that Louis XVI ended the way he did. As sovereign of his own country, the decisions he made must have affected his fate?

elena maria vidal said...

I answer that question in my novel TRIANON.

Brian Edward Miles said...

anothertwocents:

Here's my two cents: Have you ever wished to uncover some long lost treasure? Open Trianon. The hidden historical riches that Mrs. Vidal reveals to us there are not to be missed. And even if you're not particularly keen on history, read Trianon anyway. To enjoy this book you need only appreciate a good story told well. Trianon is the kind of book that readers hope for and writers dream about.

Though I am not yet finished with Trianon, I especially enjoyed how Mrs. Vidal began the story. How clever to first show us the Queen through the eyes of an artist. We begin with Madame Vigee-Lebrun describing for us, with all of the characteristic insight of a master, the first impressions of the woman she would try to capture on canvas. That her work was ultimately a great success is beyond dispute; it is the kind of portrait that discloses much more than mere appearances: mystery, kindness, and strength of spirit--all of those qualities which make us sit up and say: "Ah! Who is she?" But in the end that is where even a great painter must (and probably should) leave us guessing. For the rest of the story we must turn to the master of another genre. Enter Trianon where Mrs. Vidal's pen so ably picks up where Madame Vigee-Lebrun's brush left off.

This is a story of epic tragedy and triumph; the kind of high and dangerous subjects that a lesser writer might easily make a mess of. But here there is no mess, only masterpiece; and one which brings honor and glory to the Heart which shine through on every page.

elena maria vidal said...

Mr. Miles, thank you for the high praise!