Saturday, December 9, 2006

Rosemary

I was just picking some rosemary to go on a pork roast. In some climates, rosemary survives the winter, but in Pennsylvania it has to be brought inside. Rosemary is a wonderful herb with curative effects and it is great for making wreaths. Marie-Antoinette loved herbs and probably had rosemary in her gardens at Trianon. Share

9 comments:

melanie said...

I ilke rosemary, too. It reminds me of incense. It is great to have lots of it around the house at Christmas time.

"Rosemary for remembrance." I always liked that.

Jeffrey Smith said...

That post reminds me of two things. First, I love rosemary even more since my favorite novelist, Elizabeth Goudge, mentioned it so often. And two, as a native Pennsylvanian, I sometimes miss those mountain winters. I love Ohio, but when God makes the valleys exalted and the mountains and hills laid low, he won't have much work around here.

elena maria vidal said...

I agree, melanie, about the incense.

Yes, Jeffrey, I drove through the mountains near Altoona yesterday and they were covered with snow, it was beautiful.

Yes, rosemary was used a great deal in the old days. I have never read Elizabeth Goudge but I have been planning on it for awhile.

wordsmith said...

Reminds me of the old English poem: "Are you going to Scarborough fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme.
Remember me to one who was there, She was once a true love of mine."

elena maria vidal said...

Here are the lyrics of the original song, which predates Simon and Garfunkel by several hundred years:

Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
For once she was a true love of mine


Have her make me a cambric shirt
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Without no seam nor fine needle work
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Tell her to weave it in a sycamore wood lane
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
And gather it all with a basket of flowers
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Have her wash it in yonder dry well
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
where water ne'er sprung nor drop of rain fell
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Have her find me an acre of land
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Between the sea foam and over the sand
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Plow the land with the horn of a lamb
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Then sow some seeds from north of the dam
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Tell her to reap it with a sickle of leather
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
And gather it all in a bunch of heather
And then she'll be a true love of mine


If she tells me she can't, I'll reply
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Let me know that at least she will try
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Love imposes impossible tasks
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Though not more than any heart asks
And I must know she's a true love of mine


Dear, when thou has finished thy task
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Come to me, my hand for to ask
For thou then art a true love of mine

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Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
For once she was a true love of mine


Have her make me a cambric shirt
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Without no seam nor fine needle work
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Tell her to weave it in a sycamore wood lane
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
And gather it all with a basket of flowers
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Have her wash it in yonder dry well
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
where water ne'er sprung nor drop of rain fell
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Have her find me an acre of land
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Between the sea foam and over the sand
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Plow the land with the horn of a lamb
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Then sow some seeds from north of the dam
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Tell her to reap it with a sickle of leather
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
And gather it all in a bunch of heather
And then she'll be a true love of mine


If she tells me she can't, I'll reply
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Let me know that at least she will try
And then she'll be a true love of mine


Love imposes impossible tasks
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Though not more than any heart asks
And I must know she's a true love of mine


Dear, when thou has finished thy task
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Come to me, my hand for to ask
For thou then art a true love of mine

↑ Back to index

elena maria vidal said...

http://www.geocities.com/paris/villa/3895/

The above lyrics are from this link. Scarborough Fair took place in the middle ages during Lammas-tide at what was a thriving port. Each of the herbs represent a certain virtue.

It is also in Tasha Tudor's book of nursery rhymes!

melanie said...

"Love imposes impossible tasks" wow, isn't that the truth.

wordsmith said...

What in the heck is Lammas-tide?

elena maria vidal said...

It was the latter part of August, after the feast of the Assumption on Aug.15.