Friday, May 9, 2008

Gloves



In the old etiquette books, hats and gloves usually went together, although hats were never worn with evening gowns. Many ladies and little girls still wear gloves at weddings, First Communions and other formal events, but until the early 1960's they were always worn in church and even while shopping. Here is what Emily Post says about gloves in her 1952 Etiquette:
Always wear gloves as well as a hat in church, and also on the street in a city. Always wear gloves in a restaurant, in a theater, when you go to lunch, or to a formal dinner, or to a dance. Always take them off when you eat. The question of length and color is one of transient fashion and personal taste.... A lady never takes off her gloves to shake hands, no matter when or where, and never apologizes for wearing gloves when shaking hands. On formal occasions she should put gloves on to shake hands with her guests when when she is hostess--and keeps them on when she is in turn a guest. Always wear gloves when standing in a receiving line. The one time she does not shake hands when wearing gloves is when they are are riding gloves or earth-stained gardening gloves, which might smudge the fresh gloves of a friend.
Gentlemen, of course, would always remove their gloves when shaking hands with a lady, according to the old rule. It is interesting how things change. I wonder why everyone stopped wearing gloves? For those who may be interested in the "dos and don'ts" of glove-wearing, there is a lot of colorful information available concerning glove etiquette and history, HERE. Share

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

One quick off topic note: I am SO enjoying your book, Trianon! Highly recommend it to all.

elena maria vidal said...

Thank you. I am glad to hear it!

Unknown said...

I am old enough to remember ladies wearing gloves. I played dress-up with my mother's gloves. Too bad they are no longer in style. Our parish actually forbabe the wearing of gloves for the first communicants.

elena maria vidal said...

That's odd. I wonder why?

Anonymous said...

Perhaps they are afraid the gloves will make it difficult for the children to receive communion in the hand. It could be hard to feel and pick up the Body through the gloves and there is a greater risk of dropping it.

If they received communion on the tongue, this would not even be an issue. I wonder if they 'allow' that option. Some parishes and priests don't 'allow' communion on the tongue...or make you feel mighty low for presenting yourself for communion that way. My husband has had a priest yell at and chastise him in the communion line for trying to receive on the tongue.

Or maybe they subscribe to the idea that we need to 'break down the barriers' between God and communicant. In their view, gloves could imply that we are not worthy to touch Our Lord. This is the same mindset that wants to ban kneeling to receive communion. 'We should stand because we are a resurrection people' and 'we receive in the hand because we take and receive communion'. Hmmmm.

At any rate - gloves are lovely and give elegance to outfits. Most styles today would look silly if gloves were worn with them. But then again most styles today look as if people have just rolled out of bed.

elena maria vidal said...

You are probably right, Margaret. And I agree.

Unknown said...

"But then again most styles today look as if people have just rolled out of bed."

Giggle...

I Remember something about a concern that the girls might leave their gloves behind, but that seems like a silly reason.

Hopefully they'll not mention this when my daughter takes her first communion. I'd like her to have gloves.

Unknown said...

This etiquette has been adopted from the time when chivalry is most treasured by the people. It is indeed a very nice and formal thing and learning about it would be a privilege especially for the young people. This tradition should never be forgotten and I say that it should be inculcated into the minds of even the new generation. :)
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